When Russell Crowe finally broke through as an actor, he really made his mark with some extraordinary performances. Then he became a typical Hollywood a-hole who wrecked his career with anger-management issues. Crowe hasn’t put in a great performance in a while, and these days he’s usually grumping and sulking his way through movies. He still looks pretty dour in 'Noah,' although we’re definitely curious to see if this biblical tale can appeal to all audiences, and not just God-fearing Christians. In the meantime, here’s some other movies you can enjoy at home that feature Russell Crowe or mass flooding.

  • 1

    'L.A. Confidential' (1997)

    In 1997, the world got swept up in ‘Titanic’ fever, even though ‘L.A. Confidential,’ an adaptation of James Ellroy's novel, received much greater critical acclaim. ‘Confidential’ was Crowe’s breakout movie, and he was part of an excellent cast including Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger and James Cromwell in an excellent against-type choice as an evil villain. Not only is the film still underrated to this day, so is director Curtis Hanson, who followed up ‘Confidential’ with another great movie, ‘The Wonder Boys.’

  • 2

    'The Insider' (1999)

    Director Michael Mann followed up his masterpiece ‘Heat’ with another incredible film, ‘The Insider,’ which is not only one of the best movies about journalism, but it also features Crowe’s best performance. Crowe should have won the Academy Award for this film. The Academy later rewarded him for ‘Gladiator,’ but ‘The Insider’ is another criminally underrated movie that should be rediscovered.

  • 3

    'Waterworld' (1995)

    Is ‘Noah’ just a biblical ‘Waterworld’? We've never considered the biblical implications of ‘Waterworld’ because it's essentially ‘Mad Max’ on water. Back in 1995, ‘Waterworld’ was vastly over-budget and a butt of many jokes. But it’s actually not a bad movie (there's great cinematography throughout). Many predicted that ‘Waterworld’ would end Kevin Costner’s career, although the movie that put him out of commission was actually ‘The Postman,’ the only movie we've ever walked out on.