Few bands are capable of simultaneously evoking such intense elation and irritation as Oasis – and that's just among the band's own members. But that explosive and openly antagonistic dynamic has always been an intrinsic part of the Manchester outfit's charm.

Formed in 1991 by singer Liam Gallagher and three of his mates, Oasis only became a fully functioning guitar pop machine once Gallagher's older brother, songwriter-guitarist Noel Gallagher, came aboard and commandeered control of the band – creative and otherwise. In 1994, Oasis rocketed to stardom in the U.K. and by the following year, they were among the biggest bands in the world. Much of their appeal came from their modernization of iconic British acts that preceded them: they adopted bits and pieces of aural aesthetics from the Rolling Stones and the Beatles along with sneering attitude from the Sex Pistols and the Stone Roses. But despite the self-destructive tendencies of the brothers Gallagher, they quickly proved to be deserving of their own praise.

While their endless in-fighting eventually led to the end of Oasis in 2009, their legacy has superseded Britpop – their name now rightly belongs alongside the likes of the legendary bands that influenced them. In this installment of Worst to First, we rank each of their studio albums. And while you might not completely agree with the order, nothing about Oasis has ever been easy to agree upon.